Free Land In America

farm landFree land in America? You bet, but like everything else it has a catch. There is land available free in every state in the United States, you just have to know who to ask. Sometimes you can’t do much with it but what the heck, it’s yours, and you can say you own it. We’ll show you where and how you can get your hands on some at the end of the article, and yes it really is free real estate.

But first a bit of history and education. American land has really always been free, free for the taking anyway. The token sums often paid for it were more for easing the conscience of the more officious, paper wielding aggressors than they were for those trespassed against. In their innocence the original inhabitants of this country, mistakenly called Indians because the invading horde really didn’t have a clue as to where they really were, didn’t understand that the land could be owned, they thought it was shared by everyone. Nor did they comprehend that a scrap of paper with symbols had any power any more than planting a few survey stakes did. But there was only so much land and trinkets, iron knives and glass beads were scarce so, sure, they made a deal, a raw deal, but, easy enough to move to the other side of the island.

Indeed there was so much land that even after all the governments and nations had made their deals and even after the land had been sold in large lots back and forth between them they found it necessary to give some of it away just so the wind didn’t take it back. The hills, prairies, streams and mountains were given away to hardy homesteaders either for free or at prices of not much more than a loaf of bread per acre. (Back when bread was cheap.) Soon enough all that was left was the land that was wicked worthless and barren, and even some of that was too poor for the native peoples to want.

But the land still had some value, if one was willing to dig it out. Mining claims allowed anyone with enough gumption to erect a shack and extract enough value, any amount over a negative number, to own the land the claim was on. Proving up on a mining claim was a handy way to become a landowner until most of  the loopholes were more or less closed up in the early 1980’s.

So one would think that the days of free real real estate in America are no more, but they’d be wrong. A bit of sniffing about shows that all kinds of land is still available for gratis, free, sin questa, por nada, zilch, zero, zip. We aren’t going to tell you everything we know, a little effort on your part will turn up more than you’d believe anyway, but if you want to take the easy road to land ownership follow this link to get free land in one or more of any of the fifty states. And yes, it really is free!

On a side note, The Yellow Press has it’s base of operations in the town of Freeland, Washington, which began as a little utopia on Whidbey Island just north of Seattle. Land was given away to like minded settlers who wanted to form a kinder, gentler community. The town now serves as the industrial/commercial center of the south end of the island. Don’t come here, it rains all the time.

DavidW - Publisher

Raised in obscurity and completely entranced with the notion that we should live our lives with the same valuable ethic that a conscientious hiker would, leaving no trace.

8 thoughts on “Free Land In America

  • 2009/10/25 at 20:21
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    I think this is a WASTE of MY TIME. I’ve been online LOOKING for some farmland that could be HOMESTEADED in Upstate and Western New York State. I don’t need to read all this garbage only to find out IT’S A BIG JOKE.

  • 2009/10/26 at 08:33
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    Marliena, Perhaps the biggest joke, a sick one, is that although we are all born into a world we should have an equal share of we are cheated out of our fair portion by systems and rules that were originally designed to permit parity. Them thats got, got, and the rest of us kinda lose. There is free land, maybe not exactly where we’d always like, (Bali anyone?}. You might look at the USDA first time homeowner programs, some of the less developed countries have homesteading opportunities for their citizens, a rich patron may allow you to sharecrop, etc. Your best hope is to approach any and all ownership issues with the knowledge that you can’t take it with you and chief Seattle was probably right. the editor

  • 2010/02/04 at 15:37
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    Funny. Very funny I think. I’ve heard about the one square inches of land before. Glad I found it – Own a Piece of america.

  • 2010/02/16 at 06:04
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    There is a lot of cheap land if someone wants to live where it’s too cold, too hot, in arid areas. In New York, there is still cheap land. It is true, if the land was left for all to use, it would be nice. The reality is that there are too many that want something without working for it.
    The Native Americans at least have a place to go, but even there, tribal elders got tired to the ones who didn’t want to put in their fair share. My utopia would be where I could live with my two horses and be free to go where I want. That is not a reality because two many crazys today would rob you, etc. Even in old times, all native americans had territories. If you were not a trader, you did not often ever leave your home territory.

  • 2010/02/26 at 07:40
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    So where can I still get free land now ? and what are the conditions ? Is there any i Rhode Island ? Massachusetts ? Do you guarantee there is free land and how much can I get ?This looks like a hoax or a CON ARTIST to me .

  • 2010/02/26 at 07:46
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    SURE ENOUGH IT IS. “ONE SQUARE INCH ” GET OFF THE WEB YOU LOW LIFE!!!
    I NEED 100 ACRES OR MORE.

  • 2010/02/26 at 07:52
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    WHAT DO YOU CALL “CHEAP LAND” ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS AN ACRE OR LESS IS CHEAP TO ME . I’D PAY LESS FOR DEATH VALLEY THOUGH.WHERE IS THE CHEAPEST LAND IN THE U.S.A.????

  • 2010/02/26 at 20:28
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    Carumba, don’t shoot me, I’m only the piano player. Free land, like everything free, may end up costing you more in the long run. Long story short, you usually get what you pay for. That $100 an acre dirt might just be dry as a mouthful of flourmeal and so alkali flat the only thing it’ll grow is psoriasis scabs. Wanna farm? Pony up. P.S. It’s been a gorgeous winter here in the Pacific Northwest, (Freeland), and I already have my garden in and flowers blooming.

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